A crossbite is malocclusion or a misalignment of the teeth where the upper teeth fit inside of the lower teeth. This can affect a single tooth or group of teeth. It can affect front teeth, back teeth, or both.

Types of crossbites include Anterior crossbite – If your front teeth are in a crossbite, one or more of the top teeth will sit behind the bottom teeth. It is important not to confuse this with an underbite, where all the top teeth or jaw are behind the bottom teeth. Posterior crossbite – If your back teeth are affected, the upper teeth will sit inside of the bottom teeth.

Why Does a Crossbite Form?

A crossbite can be caused by genetics, or by other factors such as the delayed loss of baby teeth or the abnormal eruption of permanent teeth. Prolonged thumb sucking or swallowing in an abnormal way can also generate damaging pressure that can cause teeth to be pushed out of place and bone to be distorted.

Why is it Important to Fix a Crossbite?

A crossbite can reveal an underlying issue with the jaw that should be addressed at a younger age during the crucial years of face and jaw development. If a crossbite is left uncorrected, possible consequences include:

  • Lopsided growth of the jaw
  • The jaw shifts to one side
  • Wearing down the enamel or outer layer of the tooth

How is a Crossbite Corrected?

The treatment will depend on the scope of the crossbite. Crossbite treatment may involve using a palatal expander. This is a fixed or removable orthodontic appliance that is used to make the upper jaw wider. The palatal expander is used in conjunction with an appliance such as braces or clear aligners to move the teeth.

Our orthodontists will evaluate your crossbite and will be able to help you determine which method or if both methods are best for correcting your crossbite.

Schedule Your Appointment with King Orthodontics Today!

A crossbite is not an issue you want to leave untreated. Contact us today to make an appointment and begin treatment for crossbite correction.

Latest posts by Dr. Bryan King (see all)